}

News Releases

  • 03/02/2015

    Case Study: Nebraska’s Ebola isolation and decontamination approach

    Washington, DC, March 2, 2015 – The Nebraska Biocontainment Unit (NBU), located at the Nebraska Medical Center, has shared its protocol for Ebola patient discharge, handling a patient’s body after death and environmental disinfection in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

  • 02/20/2015

    Access CRE resources

    A CRE outbreak, linked to contaminated endoscopes, has been reported at UCLA's Ronald Reagan Medical Center. This is the second outbreak reported this year. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a safety communication regarding cleaning ERCP endoscopes (also called duodenoscopes).

  • 02/17/2015

    APIC collaborates on development of new CDC Ebola training modules for emergency departments

    Washington, D.C., February 17, 2015 –The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) assisted the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality to create four new interactive, web-based training modules for emergency department personnel who treat patients with infectious diseases, which are now available on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.

  • 01/30/2015

    Measles: What you should know

    Because measles has recently made a comeback in the U.S., APIC's Communications Committee has created a fact sheet on the disease for consumers.

  • 01/27/2015

    Low influenza vaccination rates among nursing home employees put residents at risk, study finds

    Influenza is associated with as many as 7,300 deaths annually in nursing home residents, but the vaccination rate for nursing home staff is only 54 percent, according to a study in the February issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

  • 01/05/2015

    Infections Increase Death Risk by 35% for ICU Patients, Study Finds

    Elderly patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) are about 35 percent more likely to die within five years of leaving the hospital if they develop an infection during their stay, a new study finds. Preventing two of the most common healthcare-associated infections – bloodstream infections caused by central lines and pneumonia caused by ventilators – can increase the odds that these patients survive and reduce the cost of their care by more than $150,000, according to a study published in the January 2015 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

  • 12/01/2014

    Study: Lapses in infection control associated with spread of severe respiratory virus MERS

    Little is known about the often fatal virus known as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), but researchers have identified gaps in infection control as a major culprit in all eleven published cases involving healthcare-associated transmission of the virus. 

  • 12/01/2014

    Case study: Nebraska Ebola unit details waste removal

    The Nebraska Biocontainment Unit, located at the Nebraska Medical Center, shares best practices for Ebola waste removal, in a commentary published in in the December issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

  • 11/25/2014

    National Influenza Vaccination Week

    National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW), hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), highlights the importance of getting an influenza vaccination every year. Seasonal influenza, often referred to simply as “the flu,” causes approximately 150,000 hospital admissions and 24,000 deaths annually in the United States. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.

  • 10/31/2014

    APIC collaborates with Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality on Ebola PPE web training

    The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) and the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality have collaborated to create an interactive, web-based, educational training program focusing on proper personal protective equipment (PPE) use for healthcare personnel caring for patients with Ebola.

  • 10/23/2014

    CDC Ebola resources

  • 10/16/2014

    Statement on Ebola

    Statement attributable to Katrina Crist, MBA, Chief Executive Officer, APIC

  • 10/07/2014

    APIC teaches the ABC’s of antibiotic resistance

    Antibiotic resistance, responsible for more than 23,000 deaths per year in the U.S., is the theme of International Infection Prevention Week (IIPW), October 19-25.

  • 09/29/2014

    ‘Deadly diarrhea’ rates nearly doubled in 10 years: study

    Infections with the intestinal superbug C. difficile nearly doubled from 2001 to 2010 in U.S. hospitals without noticeable improvement in patient mortality rates or hospital lengths of stay, according to a study of 2.2 million C. difficile infection (CDI) cases published in the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

  • 09/09/2014

    Increase in enterovirus D68 pediatric cases reported in Midwest

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that hospitals in Missouri and Illinois are seeing an increased number of children with the severe respiratory illness enterovirus D68. Other states are also investigating clusters of children with severe respiratory symptoms that may be caused by enterovirus D68.

  • 09/03/2014

    New paper calls for more infection control surveillance, standardization in the emergency department

    When researchers searched the literature to determine adherence rates for various infection prevention protocols in the emergency department (ED), they discovered both a dearth of studies reporting ED practices and a lack of standardization that rendered some studies incomparable, according to a literature review published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

  • 07/28/2014

    Fist bumping beats germ-spreading handshake, study reports

    “Fist bumping” transmits significantly fewer bacteria than either handshaking or high-fiving, while still addressing the cultural expectation of hand-to-hand contact between patients and clinicians, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

  • 07/11/2014

    Recreational water illnesses

    Summer is here, so now is the time to get out and enjoy the weather and get into the water. But don’t let all that beautiful blue water fool you; it can be contaminated with many germs that can cause recreational water illnesses (RWI). The July 2014 consumer alert focuses on RWI and how to stay safe from infection while lounging at the pool or on the beach. 

  • 06/30/2014

    Study finds low hand hygiene compliance rates during anesthesia administration

    Anesthesia providers are missing opportunities to clean their hands during surgical procedures, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

  • 06/20/2014

    New patient backgrounder on Hepatitis A

    Traveling this summer? Pack more than just your clothes—Pack a vaccination!! 

    This month's consumer alert focuses on Hepatitis A, a viral infection that causes inflammation of the liver. It is usually a mild illness, but in some instances, it can cause severe liver damage. A person can get Hepatitis A by ingesting food or drink contaminated with fecal matter, or by coming in contact with an object that was contaminated with feces (stool) from a person who has Hepatitis A. 

    This month's consumer alert was developed by APIC Communications Committee member, Cindy Kohan, MT(ASCP), MS, CIC.

    Read the article to learn more.